wickedprettylittlethings:

Little blue friar bow your head
And give a prayer for the dead
"Monkshood is a distinctive looking wildflower borne on shoulder high erect and sturdy stems. The common name for this plant comes from the hood-like sepal on the flower. The hood is thought to look like an old fashioned cowl worn by monks.
All parts of monkshood are poisonous, especially the roots and seeds, and the flowers if eaten. In the past, wolves and criminals were poisoned with an extract from the European wolfsbane Acontium lycoctonum. This species was also supposedly used as a component in witches’ brew.
Marked symptoms appear within a few minutes of the administration of a poisonous dose of aconite. The initial signs are gastrointestinal. There is a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth, and of burning in the abdomen. Usually death ensues before a numbing effect on the intestine can be observed. After about an hour, there is severe vomiting. Pronounced motor weakness and cutaneous sensations similar to those above described soon follow. The pulse and respiration steadily fail until death occurs from asphyxia."   -American Association for Clinical Chemistry. 

Aconitum, also known as “the queen of poisons”, aconite, monkshood, wolf’s bane, leopard’s bane, women’s bane, devil’s helmet or blue rocket, is a genus of over 250 species of flowering plants belonging to the family Ranunculaceae. These herbaceous perennial plants are chiefly native to the mountainous parts of the northern hemisphere, growing in the moisture-retentive but well-draining soils of mountain meadows.
The name comes from the Greek ἀκόνιτον meaning ‘without struggle’. Toxins extracted from the plant were used to kill wolves in older times, hence the name wolf’s bane.
They thrive in garden soils, and will grow in the shade of trees. 
Internal uses were also pursued, to slow the pulse, as a sedative in pericarditis and heart palpitations, and well diluted as a mild diaphoretic, or to reduce feverishness in treatment of colds, pneumonia, quinsy, laryngitis, croup, and asthma due to exposure. Taken internally, aconite acts very notably on the circulation, the respiration, and the nervous system. The pulse is slowed, the number of beats per minute being actually reduced, under considerable doses, to forty, or even thirty, per minute. The blood-pressure synchronously falls, and the heart is arrested in diastole. Immediately before arrest, the heart may beat much faster than normal, though with extreme irregularity, and in animals the auricles may be observed occasionally to miss a beat, as in poisoning by veratrine and colchicum. The action of aconitine on the circulation is due to an initial stimulation of the cardio-inhibitory centre in the medulla oblongata (at the root of the vagus nerves), and later to a directly toxic influence on the nerve-ganglia and muscular fibres of the heart itself. The fall in blood-pressure is not due to any direct influence on the vessels. The respiration becomes slower owing to a paralytic action on the respiratory centre and, in warm-blooded animals, death is due to this action, the respiration being arrested before the action of the heart. Aconite further depresses the activity of all nerve-terminals, the sensory being affected before the motor. In small doses, it therefore tends to relieve pain, if this is present. The activity of the spinal cord is similarly depressed. The pupil is at first contracted, and afterwards dilated. The cerebrum is totally unaffected by aconite, consciousness and the intelligence remaining normal to the last. The antipyretic action which considerable doses of aconite display is not specific but is the result of its influence on the circulation and respiration and of its slight diaphoretic action.
Marked symptoms may appear almost immediately, usually not later than one hour, and “with large doses death is almost instantaneous.” Death usually occurs within 2 to 6 hours in fatal poisoning (20 to 40 mL of tincture may prove fatal). The initial signs are gastrointestinal including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This is followed by a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth and face, and of burning in the abdomen. In severe poisonings pronounced motor weakness occurs and cutaneous sensations of tingling and numbness spread to the limbs. Cardiovascular features include hypotension, sinus bradycardia, and ventricular arrhythmias. Other features may include sweating, dizziness, difficulty in breathing, headache, and confusion. The main causes of death are ventricular arrhythmias and asystole, paralysis of the heart or of the respiratory center. The only post-mortem signs are those of asphyxia.
Poisoning may also occur following picking the leaves without wearing gloves; the aconitine toxin is absorbed easily through the skin. In this event, there will be no gastrointestinal effects. Tingling will start at the point of absorption and extend up the arm to the shoulder, after which the heart will start to be affected. The tingling will be followed by unpleasant numbness.
A Soldier and a Marine just testing out their camo.

pettyofficerdongers:

captainkristine:

this-is-my-life-lacy:

imageimage

lololololol

I’m reblogging this again cause it’s that awesome.

Then there’s the Navy

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(Fuente: thewhitechickoj, vía mkhunterz)

my-flourish-and-blotts:

bendiddly:

amy-rory-melody:

lordkorra:

psychiatrist-cannibal by day

pop-star singing sensation by night

hannibal montanibal 

aren’t we supposed to be a really dark and sophisticated fandom

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We are a really dark and sophisticated fandom.

(Fuente: sevipered, vía crohataon)

breachthechrysalis:

Yoshitaka Amano
http://breachthechrysalis.tumblr.com/
panischeangst:

sommeraufderhaut:

<3


-
skinned-flowers:

godth:

juugin:

markhar baphomet

Markhor horns are amazing.

Goats 😍